Kid with disability rowing

In Tasmania, key child safety responsibilities for sport and recreation include:

Registration to Work with Vulnerable People

Sporting organisations have a legal and moral obligation to ensure that all persons required to hold their registration to Work with Vulnerable People are compliant in order to reduce the risk of harm to children and vulnerable adults.

The Registration to Work with Vulnerable People Act, 2013 applies to anyone involved in child-related work or volunteering in Tasmania. The Act states that anyone who is involved in a regulated activity must hold valid registration to work with children and vulnerable people. Regulated activities include cultural, recreational, sporting or community activities delivered by clubs, associations or other similar bodies.

What responsibilities does an employer or volunteer body have?

If you are engaging a volunteer or a paid worker, you need to verify whether they hold valid registration to work with vulnerable people before they start work. Clubs and associations should not accept the registration card alone as evidence. The system of verifying a registration is online, through the Check the status of registration page on the Consumer, Building and Occupational Services (CBOS) website.

How do I apply for Registration to Work with Vulnerable People?

Applications for Registration to Work with Vulnerable People are lodged online via the Apply for registration page on the CBOS website. Once you have completed your application you must verify your identity and pay the registration fee at Service Tasmania.

What happens once I apply?

Once your application has been assessed you will be issued with either a Registration to Work with Vulnerable People card or a refusal. In all cases before final refusal, a preliminary negative notice will be issued which will provide the applicant with the opportunity to provide further information.

How much does it cost?

There are two classes of registration - Employment/Volunteer or Volunteer only.

  • $110.60 Employment/Volunteer
  • $18.96 Volunteer

Who is responsible for payment?

The person applying is responsible. Contact your club or association to find out their policy in relation to reimbursement for members registering to work with vulnerable people.

Are there exemptions from registration?

You may not need to apply for Registration to Work with Vulnerable People if:

  • you are a child who is under the age of 16 and working with younger children
  • you are engaged in a regulated activity (other than an overnight camp for children) and have only incidental physical contact with children; and
  • you are engaged in a regulated activity for a particular employer for not more than 7 days in any calendar year. Note: Exemption timeframes are based on days not hours. Per day equates to one event in a day – i.e., one hour of parent help at a school or one hour working as a soccer coach for a club/association
  • you are engaged in a regulated activity (other than an overnight camp for children) for a particular employer and have more than incidental physical contact with children but there is a registered person present (and for not more than 7 days in any calendar year)
  • you are registered under another State’s law and the activity is of a similar nature to the activity that you are already registered to engage in under that corresponding law; and you are engaged in the regulated activity for not more than 28 days in any 12- month period
  • you are a close relative of the child
  • you are doing the same activity as the child (for example, playing together in a sporting team)
  • for more information visit the Exemptions from registration page on the CBOS website

What information is assessed for Registration to Work with Vulnerable People?

Your records will be assessed to see if you have charges or convictions that indicate you pose a risk of harm to a child.

This includes information about:

  • Convictions for all criminal offences you may have
  • All ‘spent’ convictions (convictions that do not need to be ordinarily declared)
  • Any ‘pending’ charges (charges that have not yet been decided by a court)
  • All ‘non-conviction’ charges (charges that have been finalised by a court but did not result in a conviction).

For how long is the Registration valid?

The registration is valid for three years. If your criminal history changes, you must advise the Department of Justice within ten days of being charged with a relevant offence. This can be done by visiting the Registration holder obligations page on the CBOS website.

Your registration will be subject to ongoing monitoring for new offences for its three-year lifespan. Some offences will trigger a risk assessment, which could lead to your registration being cancelled.

Is it transferable to a different organisation?

Yes, it is transferable to any organisation in which you work or volunteer with children.

Who administers the process?

Employers, clubs and associations must have an administrative process in place to ensure employees and volunteers who carry out child-related work hold a valid Registration to Work with Vulnerable People card. Contact your state sporting organisation to determine what policies they have in place for registering to work with vulnerable people.

A Working with Children and Vulnerable People Policy applies to all members and activities within your sport that involve children and vulnerable adults. If your sport is yet to develop a policy, there is a Working with Children and Vulnerable People Policy template and fact sheet available on the Child Safe Sport page on the Communities, Sport and Recreation website.

What are the requirements for visitors from other states/territories?

You can use equivalent interstate Working with Children Registration in Tasmania for up to 28 days. For further information check online on the Interstate and overseas applicants page of the CBOS website.

Resources

More resources are available on the Resources page of the CBOS website

Phone: 1300 654 499

Website: www.cbos.tas.gov.au/topics/licensing-and-registration/registrations/work-with-vulnerable-people

Reporting child abuse - Child Safety Service

Who is required to report concerns regarding child safety?

In Tasmania, members of certain professions are legally obliged to report child abuse or neglect to the Child Safety Service under the Children, Young Persons and their Families Act 1997.

All adults in our community regardless of their legal reporting obligations have a moral obligation to look out for children and keep them safe.

An important early step if you are worried about a child is to contact the Child Safety Service Advice and Referral Line. A staff member will talk to you about the situation, answer your questions, give you information or advice and assess the risk to the child based on the information you disclose and any other information available to them.

What gets reported?

Any reasonable suspicion of neglect or abuse should be reported. People who call the Advice and Referral Line have a legal right to confidentiality.

Where do I make the report?

  • By phoning the Advice and Referral Line on 1800 000 123.
  • If a child is at immediate risk and Police or medical assistance is required, dial 000.
  • As an alternative method for reporting non-urgent concerns, an online contact form is available for use on the Child Protection Notification Form page of the Communities Tasmania website.
    Do you need more information? Visit the Child Safety Notifications page on the Communities Tasmania website.

Child Safe Sport

What child safe practices can we adopt at our club/association? There is a lot more to keeping children safe in sport, than just complying with the legal requirements of the Registration to Work with Vulnerable People Act.

Developing practices to create a child safe culture in your sport, not only minimises the risk of child abuse, but also creates supportive physical and emotional boundaries in which children can participate. Keeping children feeling safe is everyone’s responsibility.

Child-safe practices include staff and volunteers receiving induction on your sport’s child safety policies, knowing who to notify should they have suspicions a child may be at risk of harm and training your coaches to work with children in a manner that recognises their physical and emotional needs.

Do you need more information? Visit the Create a child safe organisation page on the Play by the Rules website.


Updated: January 2019